Here is a comprehensive look at the body of works New York artist Marilyn Minter created for her most recent exhibition at Regen Projects. For her second show at the gallery, Minter debuted five monumental paintings while accompanying this body of work will is Minter’s earliest black and white photographic series. Taken in 1969, these photos of her drug-addicted mother set the stage for Minter’s career-long exploration of the pathology of glamour.

Three years in the making, these new large-scale paintings deepen Minter’s investigation of how we communicate with the illusion of glamour via advertising in public spaces.  Cracked glass, swaths of vibrant graffiti, and dripping water confront the viewer and obscure Minter’s archetypal images of stiletto heels and eyes caked with makeup.  Meticulously painted in Minter’s signature style, the paintings are constructed using many translucent layers of enamel paint, creating an image that at once crystallizes and dissolves for the viewer.

The early photographic series Coral Ridge Towers depicts Minter’s mother on an ordinary weekend at home in her Florida condominium. She is pictured performing her daily rituals of beautification and torpor through the lens of addiction.

Thanks to Arrested Motion for the images.